Double-click to enter your text here. Use the text menu to add title text or to style parts of your text.

Generation Jetta

The Mk5 Jetta

It now gets confusing it's also known as the Sagitar and the Vento

the fifth generation of the Volkswagen Jetta and the successor to the Mk4 (Bora) debuted at the Los Angeles Auto Show on 5 January 2005. After the New Beetle, it was the second Volkswagen product to make its world debut at a U.S. auto show. The Mk 5 sedan went on sale in the USA prior to any other country, reflecting the importance of the car in that market for Volkswagen. VW spent US$800 million to upgrade its Puebla facilities for this model's production. This included a US$290 million new engine production line for the 5-cylinder power plant, a US$50 million investment in the press shop, as well as a US$200 million purchase of 460 robots, which increased automation by 80%.


In most countries, the fifth generation is marketed as the Jetta. Exceptions to this include "Bora" in Mexico and Colombia, "Vento" in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, and "Sagitar" in China. The Mk 5 is 170 millimetres (6.7 in) longer, 30 millimetres (1.2 in) wider, and has a 70 millimetres (2.8 in) longer wheelbase than the Mk4. Interior room has increased from 2.46 cubic metres (87 cu ft) to 2.58 cubic metres (91 cu ft). In particular, rear legroom was increased by 65 millimetres (2.6 in) over the fourth generation. Luggage compartment volume is up to 453 litres (16 cu ft). One major change is the introduction of the first multi-link independent rear suspension in a Jetta. The design of the rear suspension is nearly identical to the one found in the Ford Focus. Volkswagen reportedly hired engineers from Ford who designed the suspension on the Focus. Although its good it has Ford DNA!! The fifth generation car has a totally redesigned electrical system. Control modules are used for everything from the radio to the powertrain, transmitting over Controller Area Network (CAN) buses. Transmission of signals is done digitally at 500 kilobits per second, which reduces the number of wires needed, and thus reduces the chance for faults. Cars equipped with halogen headlamps have a 'VW' logo integrated into the bulb shield. In most of the world, the rear lights use light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, in North America, standard filament bulbs with a different design are used to comply with FMVSS 108.


Although produced in the largest volumes in Mexico, final assembly of the car also tooks place in China and South Africa for those respective markets. Like initial production of the second generation in China, the Asian and African plants build the car from a complete knock down (CKD) kit shipped from the factory in Puebla. Local assembly in Kaluga, Russia, started in early 2008. Production also began in India in 2008. Eventually, the Škoda factory in Aurangabad was used for final assembly. As with the previously mentioned assembly plants, CKD kits from Volkswagen de México were to be used.


Volkswagen debuted a station wagon variant of the Jetta at the 2007 New York International Auto Show, with a cargo volume of 930 litres (33 cu ft) and 1,894 litres (66.9 cu ft) (rear seats up/down) and an optional 1.18 square metres (12.7 sq ft) panoramic sunroof. VW marketed the station wagon as the Jetta SportWagen in the United States, Bora Sportwagen in Mexico, Golf Break and later Golf SW in France, Jetta Variant in Brazil, Vento Variant in Argentina, Jetta Wagon in Canada (2009 only), Golf Wagon in Canada (2010 onwards), Golf Estate in the United Kingdom and Golf Variant in the German domestic and most other markets. In 2010, the Sportwagen received a minor interior and exterior facelift, and remained based on the fifth-generation Golf, with front end styling mirroring the sixth-generation Golf.


Body & Engines

Styling reflected a new direction for the Volkswagen brand, with a new chrome front grille, first seen on the Volkswagen Golf Mk5 R32, which then spread to other models.like the Passat and Toureg Some critics appreciated the new styling, whilst others dismissed it as just as bland as the 4th generation. The body of the fifth generation used extensive high strength steel, and use of laser welding is up from 5% to 35% of body parts. This resulted in double-digit increases in both dynamic and torsional rigidity. Other body innovations include an impact-absorbing front bumper which yields slightly in the event of a collision with a pedestrian, reducing the chance of injury. A new door design allows just the outer panel to be removed and replaced if damaged, rather than the entire door. Safety was again enhanced with many active and passive features available or standard. These included side curtain airbags, seat-mounted rear side airbags, new generation Electronic Stability Programme with Anti-Slip Regulation and Brake assist, as well as active head restraints. A Direct-Shift Gearbox (DSG) transmission, available dual-zone automatic climate control, and electro-mechanical power steering are also new innovations.


engines available were dependent on the destination market. In Europe, a range of the new generation Fuel Stratified Injection (FSI) engines were available. Additionally in that market, the car could be had with an engine known as the 'Twincharger'. This 1.4 litre petrol engine combines turbo- and supercharging, to make a small but powerful engine with low fuel consumption. The Jetta available in the Americas and the Middle East was powered by a 2.5-litre 5-cylinder 20-valve engine in most trims. This engine shares its cylinder head design with the V10 engine found in the Lamborghini Gallardo and Audi R8.


When the Mk 5 Jetta was introduced, the Turbocharged Direct Injection (TDI) diesel engine was not offered in five U.S. States due to the tight emission standards promulgated by the California Air Resources Board. In addition to California, four other states adopted the more stringent California standards. Where it was available, it fell into the least-restrictive emission category. That category was removed in 2007, prompting the diesel Jetta to be unavailable for more than a year until the introduction of a new common rail diesel engine, which appeared in August 2008. The introduction was delayed for approximately six months due to technical issues with the new emissions control system. The TDI Clean Diesel engine is rated 103 kilowatts (138 hp; 140 PS), and uses advanced features such as a diesel particulate filter and NOx-storage catalyst (vs. AdBlue) to reduce NOx in order to qualify as a Tier II Bin 5 vehicle (equivalent to California's LEV II rating), and thereby allowing it to be sold in all 50 U.S. states. AdBlue (urea injection fluid) is not required, further reducing maintenance requirements. In 2015 it was found that this engine's emissions had been falsified.


For model year 2009, certain markets saw a new base model internal combustion engine and automatic transmission. The previous 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine, and six-speed automatic transmission, were replaced with a smaller, more powerful, and more fuel efficient, 1.4-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine, and six-speed DSG transmission (the same as used in the new Golf Mk5). As a result of the change, fuel consumption was improved (by 17% for the manual, from 8.2 L/100 km (34 mpg‑imp; 29 mpg‑US) down to 6.8 L/100 km (42 mpg‑imp; 35 mpg‑US)), and 23% for the automatic, from 8.6 L/100 km (33 mpg‑imp; 27 mpg‑US) down to 6.6 L/100 km (43 mpg‑imp; 36 mpg‑US). Power was increased 7%, from 110 kW (148 hp; 150 PS), to 118 kW (158 hp; 160 PS), while torque is up 20%. In addition, acceleration times 0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) have improved, from 9.2 s to 8.5 s for the manual (an 8% improvement), and from 9.9 s to 8.5 s for the automatic (a 14% improvement).